Concerts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Friday 9 October
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal
7pm Gala Opening
Works by
Ludwig van Beethoven

Saturday 10 October
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal
7pm Beethoven meets Schubert
Works by
Schubert and Ludwig van Beethoven
*********
*********

 

****************************************************************
 
Saturday 10 October
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal
7pm Beethoven meets Schubert


Etienne Chenevier - piano

 

 



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
(1770-1827)

The Andante favori WoO 57 / 1803

The Andante favori was written between 1803 and 1804, and published in 1805. It was originally intended to be the second of the three movements of Beethoven's Waldstein piano sonata, Op. 53.

Ries Beethoven secretary and pupil reports (Notizen, p. 101) that a friend of Beethoven's said to him that the sonata was too long, for which he was terribly taken to task by the composer. But after quiet reflection Beethoven was convinced of the correctness of the criticism. The andante... was therefore excluded and in its place supplied the interesting Introduction to the rondo which it now has. A year after the publication of the sonata, the andante also appeared separately.

The reason for the title was given by Beethoven's pupil Czerny, quoted in Thayer: "Because of its popularity (for Beethoven played it frequently in society) he gave it the title Andante favori ("favored Andante").



FRANZ SCHUBERT
(1797-1828)

Wanderer Fantasie OP.15(D 760) / 1822

The whole work is based on one single basic motive from which all themes are developed. This motive is distilled from the theme of the C-sharp minor second movement, which is a sequence of variations on a melody taken from the lied "Der Wanderer", which Schubert wrote in 1816. It is this set of variations from which the work's popular name is derived.

The four movements are played without a break. After the first movement Allegro con fuoco ma non troppo in C major and the second movement Adagio, follow a scherzo presto in A-flat major and the technically transcendental finale, which starts in fugato returning to the key of C major and becomes more and more virtuosic as it moves toward its thunderous nonfugal conclusion.

It is widely considered Schubert's most technically demanding composition for the piano. Schubert himself said "the devil may play it," in reference to his own inability to do so properly.

The whole work is based on one single basic motive from which all themes are developed. This motive is distilled from the theme of the C-sharp minor second movement, which is a sequence of variations on a melody taken from the lied "Der Wanderer", which Schubert wrote in 1816. It is this set of variations from which the work's popular name is

The Hungarian composer Franz Liszt, who was fascinated by the Wanderer Fantasy, transcribed it for piano and orchestra and two pianos He additionally edited the original score and added some various interpretations in ossia, and made a complete rearrangement of the final movement.



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Sonata No 23 OP57 “Appassionata” / 1805

1. Allegro assai
2. Andante con moto
3. Allegro ma non troppo – Presto

One of his greatest and most technically challenging piano sonatas, the Appassionata was considered by Beethoven to be his most tempestuous piano sonata until the twenty-ninth piano sonata (known as the Hammerklavier)[citation needed]. 1803 was the year Beethoven came to grips with the irreversibility of his progressively deteriorating hearing.