Concerts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Music of a Marriage
Friday 1st Nov, 7pm
Concert /Grand Ballroom
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal

Delightful master pieces for piano 4 hands
Sunday 3rd Nov
11am Matinee Concert
Grand Salon
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal
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Sunday 3rd November
Raffles Hotel - Le Royal
Matinee Concert /Grand Salon


11 am - Delightful master pieces for piano 4 hands

 



CÉCILE CHAMINADE
(1857-1944)

6 Pièces Romantiques Op.55

Primavera
La chaise à porteurs
Idylle arabe
Sérénade d'automne
Danse hindoue
Rigaudon

Chaminade's music has been described as tuneful, highly accessible and mildly chromatic, and it may be regarded as bearing the typical characteristics of late-Romantic French music.



FANNY MENDELSSOHN
(1805-1847)

Three Pieces

Fanny was Felix Mendelssohn's older sister, the family's first born child. She enjoyed the same musical education and upbringing as her brother, including studying with such teachers as Ignaz Moscheles. Like Felix, Fanny showed prodigious musical ability as a child both as a pianist and also as a budding composer.



MARIE JAËL
(1846-1925)

Valses pour piano á 4 mains, Op. 8

I, V, VIII, VII, IX & Finale

Marie Jaëll was a French pianist, composer, and pedagogue. She composed pieces for piano, concertos, quartets, and others. Marie Jaëll did scientific studies of hand techniques in piano playing and attempted to replace traditional drilling with systematic piano methods. She concertized with duo piano and four-handed pieces from the age of fourteen, and later she and husband Alfred transcribed and performed much of the contemporary four-handed literature.



GERMAINE TAILLEFERE
(1892-1983)

Image

Tailleferre was born to a family living in the outskirts of Paris on April 19, 1892. Despite having exposed young Germaine to music from an early age, Tailleferre's parents considered music to be an inappropriate activity for a young lady, and it was not until her twelfth year that Tailleferre convinced them to allow her to pursue serious studies at the Paris Conservatoire, where she studied accompaniment, harmony, and counterpoint, eventually taking first prizes in each. During the years following her graduation she also received a few informal lessons in orchestration from Maurice Ravel.

While a student at the Conservatoire, Tailleferre met composers Auric, Milhaud and Honegger, and after the premiere of her String Quartet in 1918, she was invited to join the Nouveaux Jeunes, a group of young composers who identified with the aesthetic of satirical composer Erik Satie and playwright Jean Cocteau which, with the addition of Tailleferre, Durey, and Poulenc, soon became known as Les Six,



ETHEL SMYTH
(1858-1944)

Scherzo

from suite Op.1a

Ethel Smyth was born in 1858 and rose to become one of the most prominent composers of the time - as well as a leading figure in the movement for women's suffrage. Ethel Smyth studied at the Leipzig Conservatory where she met composers including Grieg, Tchaikovsky, Clara Schumann and Brahms. From writing 'The March of the Women' for her and her fellow suffragettes, to being arrested and then conducting the march through the bars of her prison cell with a toothbrush, Ethel was an advocate for women's rights. She continued to fight for her rightful place as a respected composer.



MEL BONIS
(1858-1937)

Pièces à 4 mains, Op.130

1. Caravane
2. Andante Religioso
3. Carillon de Fête
4. A Matines
5. Habanera
6. Les Gitanos

Mel Bonis (Melanie Helene Bonis 1858-1937) was born in Paris. She was a gifted but long underrated composer. She used the pseudonym Mel Bonis because she rightly felt women composers of her time weren't taken seriously as artists. Her music represents a link between the Romantic and Impressionist movements in France.



AMY BEACH
(1867-1944)

Summer Dreams Op.47

1. The Brownies
2. Robin Redbreast
3. Twilight
4. Katy-dids
5. Elfin Tarantelle

Amy Beach was an American composer and pianist. She was the first successful American female composer of large-scale art music. As a pianist, she was acclaimed for concerts she gave featuring her own music in the United States and in Germany. In November-December 1913 she played the solo part in her Piano Concerto with orchestras in Leipzig, Hamburg, and Berlin. A Hamburg critic wrote "we have before us undeniably a possessor of musical gifts of the highest kind; a musical nature touched with genius." She was greeted as the first American woman "able to compose music of a European quality of excellence."



Piano Duo Nakaishi/Sakano